Crime

More Controversy for Couric’s Anti-Gun “Documentary”

Did Crew Send a Producer to Commit a Felony?

Not long after the deceptive editing used in Katie Couric’s “Under the Gun was brought to light, it looks like there might be more controversy surrounding the anti-gun film masquerading as a documentary.

If you are not familiar with the situation, Couric’s film crew edited in roughly 8 seconds of silence and uneasy glances from gun owners after she asks them a question about how to prevent bad guys from obtaining firearms.  To many, this made the interviewees look like “idiots.”  What actually happened was that several of the interviewees immediately provided sound, cogent responses to her question.

Now, in a recent interview with LipTV’s Ondi Timoner,  Under the Gun producer Stephanie Soechtig seemingly admits to sending another producer (from Colorado) to Arizona, where he “was able to buy a Bushmaster and then three other pistols.”  Unfortunately, this is a federal crime – despite what Soechtig says – as interstate purchases of long guns must be performed through an FFL in that state (when allowed at all), and interstate purchases of handguns are flatly illegal.

Soechtig says:

We sent a producer out and he was from Colorado.  He went to Arizona and he was able to buy a Bushmaster and then three other pistols without a background check in a matter of four hours.  And that’s perfectly legal.  He wasn’t doing some sort of, like, underground market.

As many readers likely already know, to legally purchase a handgun from out of state, the firearm must be shipped to an FFL in your state, and then transferred to the purchaser as usual, including a NICS background check.

A number of producers are listed on the film’s credits page, however, it appears that there are only two male names which would match up with Soechtig’s claim that the producer they sent was a “he.”  Interestingly, one of the male producers named operates a twitter page listing his location as Denver, Colorado – where Soechtig claims the producer who made the illegal purchases was from.

We hope for the sake of the producer and the Arizona seller of the firearms, that what this “documentary” film maker says in the interview is just more lies from the anti-gun left, otherwise she may have just created two new felons!

Gang Members Who Shot Up Mother’s Day Parade Get Life

ATF Success Story: Brothers Sentenced Three Years After 2013 Parade Violence

nola-nibinShootings, drugs, gang violence. It’s in the news a lot these days…most every day, in some fashion. What isn’t seen every day, what doesn’t usually make breaking news is when justice is delivered and the shooters are taken off the streets.

Three years ago, on a sunny afternoon in New Orleans, a Mother’s Day celebration turned violent when shots rang out leaving 20 people injured. A parade was underway in the 7th Ward in New Orleans. The gun play? It was all about control over turf, drugs, and the Frenchmen/Derbigny, also known as the FnD gang.

Last month, Travis Scott, aka “Trap,” aka “Slim,” Shawn Scott, aka “Shizzle,” Stanley Scott, aka “Stizzle,” and Akein Scott, aka “Keemy,” were sentenced in United States District Court, Eastern District of Louisiana for charges related to racketeering conspiracy, drug conspiracy, firearms conspiracy, and discharge of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime. The Scott brothers had previously pleaded guilty to these charges.

According to court documents, the FnD gang was an enterprise engaged in racketeering under federal law. The Scott brothers, as members of this gang, conspired to commit numerous overt acts in furtherance of the gang’s activities. Gang members sold illegal drugs, such as heroin and crack cocaine, and they committed acts of violence, including shootings. FnD members often sold drugs in the Frenchmen Meat Market, a convenience store located at the corner of Frenchmen and North Derbigny Streets. FnD members used intimidation, violence, and threats of violence to maintain the gang’s control over turf that extended from Elysian Fields Avenue, North Johnson Street, the I-10 Interstate Highway, St. Anthony Street, and North Claiborne Avenue.   Continue reading

ATF, NSSF Coordinate to Offer Reward in Firearm Theft Cases

Guns Stolen in South Carolina and Alabama

BATFE LogoNot long after the recent release of the BATFE’s 2015 FFL Theft and Loss Report – which reported a total of nearly 15,000 lost or stolen firearms last year – the Bureau is trying to solve more firearm theft cases with the help of firearms industry industry trade association National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF).

The BATFE, and NSSF have announced a reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the theft of firearms from Lexington Pawn & Gun, a Federal Firearm Licensee (FFL), in Lexington, SC.  ATF is offering a reward of up to $5,000, which will be matched by the NSSF for a total reward of up to $10,000.

Two separate burglaries occurred at Lexington Pawn & Gun, 4884 Sunset Blvd, Lexington, SC.  On Feb. 13, 2016, at approximately 4 AM, unidentified suspect(s) broke into Lexington Pawn & Gun. The suspect(s) stole several firearms and fled the scene.

On March 5, 2016, at approximately 2:08 AM, unidentified suspect(s) broke into Lexington Pawn & Gun. The suspect(s) stole several firearms and fled the scene.

These crimes are being investigated by ATF and the Lexington Police Department.

In a, presumably unrelated incident, a separate reward is offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction for those responsible for the theft of firearms from Patriot Gun Sales in Montgomery, AL.

On March 10, 2016, Patriot Gun Sales, 3079 Wetumpka Highway, Montgomery, was burglarized and approximately 18 firearms were reported stolen to the Montgomery Police Department.  ATF is offering the reward in the amount of $2,500, which will be matched by the NSSF for a total reward of up to $5,000.

These rewards are part of a larger national cooperative initiative between the NSSF and ATF in which NSSF matches ATF rewards in cases involving the theft of firearms from federally licensed firearms retailers.  ATF works closely with members of the firearms industry to curb the criminal acquisition and misuse of firearms.

ATF along with our law enforcement partners are committed to ensuring that our communities are safe and that those who violate federal laws are held accountable. Anyone with information about these crimes should contact ATF at 1-800-ATF-GUNS (800-283-4867). All calls will be kept confidential.

ATF Releases 2015 FFL Theft and Loss Report

BATFE LogoThe Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (BATFE) is responsible for investigating instances where firearms are lost or stolen from a Federal Firearms Licensee (FFL). Part of ATF’s core mission is to protect the public from violent crime involving the use of firearms. Stolen firearms are used by violent offenders in the commission of crimes, and pose a substantial threat to the public and law enforcement.

FFLs must report each lost or stolen firearm within 48 hours of discovery of the loss or theft by completing and forwarding a Federal Firearms Licensee Theft/Loss Report to ATF. In addition, the FFL must also report the firearm loss or theft to the appropriate local law enforcement agency.

There was a total of 14,800 lost or stolen firearms reported nationwide last year from FFLs. Of those firearms, 8,637 were reported as lost. Firearms are considered lost when an FFL takes a firearm into its inventory and later cannot account for the disposition of the firearm from its inventory during an inventory reconciliation.

There were 6,163 firearms reported stolen in 2015 by FFLs. Stolen firearms are broken down into three reporting categories: larceny, burglary and robbery.    Continue reading

Man Who Stole 111 Firearms from Smith & Wesson Factory Sentenced to More Than 17 Years in Prison

BATFE LogoDeirdre M. Daly, United States Attorney for the District of Connecticut, and Daniel J. Kumor, Special Agent in Charge of the ATF Boston Field Division, announced that Elliot Perez, 30, of Bridgeport, was sentenced today by U.S. District Judge Alvin W. Thompson in Hartford to 210 months of imprisonment, followed by three years of supervised release, for stealing 111 firearms from the Smith & Wesson manufacturing plant in Springfield, Mass, and selling many of those firearms on the street.

“This defendant not only stole more than 100 firearms, but he quickly sold dozens of them on the street putting them directly into the hands of criminals,” said U.S. Attorney Daly. “Not only are the stolen guns now turning up in criminal investigations as far away as North Carolina, but one was used in a Bridgeport murder and another in a shooting at a Hartford night club. As more than 50 of these guns are still at large, there is no telling how many additional acts of violence will stem from this offense. These sobering facts make clear that this long prison term is fair and appropriate. We thank the Stratford and Bridgeport Police Departments for their excellent work in quickly arresting these defendants, and the ATF for their investigative work and ongoing efforts to identify and recover the missing firearms.”

“The theft of over 100 guns is a serious threat to public safety and this sentence sends the message that it will not be tolerated, said ATF Special Agent in Charge Kumor. “Firearms trafficking continues to be a top priority for ATF and our law enforcement partners and we are committed to identifying and disrupting the sources of illegal firearms, which jeopardize the safety of our communities.”

According to court documents and statements made in court, on November 8, 2012, Perez, a truck driver for Pace Motor Lines, picked up five boxes of firearms from the Continue reading

Newtown Families Sue Bushmaster Over Rifle Used In Sandy Hook Shooting

As noted on the GunLink Forums last week, families of victims of the Sandy Hook tragedy had filed wrongful death notices over the the December 2012 killings by Adam Lanza in Newtown, CT.  This was widely seen as the first step towards a lawsuit as the two-year deadline to file approached.  Now those families are moving forward with a class action lawsuit in Connecticut superior court against the manufacturer of the firearm that Lanza used.

The complaint claims that the Bushmaster rifle is a military weapon, citing its “efficiency as a military assault rifle,” high muzzle velocity, large magazine capacity, and ability for effective rapid fire.  The complaint goes on to call the rifle a “civilian weapon marketed for combat” before going on to trot out the standard anti-gun “sporting purpose” line.  In addition to monetary and punitive damages “in excess of $15,000” and attorney’s fees, plaintiffs are seeking injunctive relief against the manufacturer and the distributors who sold the rifle.

The Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act generally prevents firearms manufacturers and dealers from being held liable for negligence when crimes have been committed with their products.  In theory, this would protect Bushmaster, Remington Outdoor Group, Freedom Group and other named defendants from legal action stemming from the tragic criminal actions committed by an untreated deranged individual.

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