Product News and Reviews

News and reviews about firearms, gear and more.

Is the New Sig P365 the Perfect Carry Gun?

It is a reasonable question to ask. The latest pistol offered by Sig Sauer is small, light, compact, and has a respectable round count for a pistol this size. While it may not be a hand-filling, full-on combat pistol, it does look like it will mark many of the boxes on any CCW checklist; and it might just be THE new concealed pistol.

While some folks will always want to carry something more along the lines of that combat pistol, many just want something that works, is effective, and is easy to carry. Obvious comparisons that come to mind are the Glock 43 and Smith & Wesson Shield – both fine pistols in that role, and quite popular.  But then Sig did this.

The Sig P365 maintains approximately the same one inch width that it shares with both the G43 and the Shield and, at 4.25 tall, is about the same height as the 43 while about half an inch shorter than the Smith. The new Sig, however, gains a big advantage for those hoping to pocket carry it: with a 5.9″ OAL, it is a quarter- to half-inch shorter than the S&W and Glock, respectively. While that reduction in length won’t matter much for carrying it on your belt, this smaller size will likely be quite noticeable in the pocket.    Continue reading

Mossberg and Remington Unleash Double-Barreled Blast of Mag Fed Shotguns at SHOT Show 2018

Mag Fed Shotgun Showdown

A few weeks ago, Big Green made a lot of noise with their launch of the new Remington 870DM that involved a bunch of marketing-department-generated secrecy and rumors and buzz that culminated in a live online product unveiling of what turned out to be (much to nobody’s surprise) a detachable magazine fed model of their popular pump action 870 shotgun.

Then, last week at SHOT Show 2018, Mossberg introduced a competing detachable box magazine fed version of their popular pump action 590 shotgun called the 590M.

Nothing ground breaking, earth shattering, or game changing, but pretty cool products from the two main sport and defense shotgun manufacturers in the US. But the big question on our minds around here is “why did it take so long?” Or maybe it’s “which one is better?” We’ll try to answer at least one of those below.

Of course, box magazine fed shotguns are nothing especially new. Semi-auto box-fed shotguns have been around for a while. Black Aces Tactical does it with their Mossberg 500-based shotguns. And what about Hurricane Butterfly’s Typhoon 12, based on Hawk’s Chinese Remington 870 clone? Adaptive Tactical has been offering their Venom conversion kits for Mossberg/Maverick shotguns for a number of years, although they kind of cheat by feeding into the magazine tube and/or using a rotary magazine.

So, while feeding fat, blunt, sometimes ribbed, plastic, rimmed cartridges with varying lengths and weights from a magazine may be a challenge, it is not impossible. So, other than being difficult, why did it take so long for the major players to make their own? Our guess is that they were just taking a wait-and-see track and finally noticed the interest in this market segment based on the other third-party offerings.

As for which one of the new offerings from the big manufacturers is better, we’ll give you some info about them and let you decide.   Continue reading

Pistol Sights of SHOT Show 2018

Rear SightsFace it, pistol sights are kind of a boring topic. There is not a lot of real estate for mounting fancy optics, pistols are not typically used for long distance shots that necessitate heavy duty upgrades, and, often, it can be a difficult or impossible task depending on the pistol. Many concealed carry guns have integrated sights machined into the slide, proprietary dovetail mounts that make it hard to find sights for, or simply require a pricey tool to do (unless you’re not afraid of whacking on them with a punch and hammer or if you use this one weird old trick).

And pistol sight upgrades are usually just not sexy unless you have a tricked out race gun topped off with the latest, greatest, highest speed, lowest drag optic, which seems to be the latest trend for “carry” guns. You will certainly find more “2-pound trigger of the week,” “custom Louis Vitton laser stipling,” “unicorn horn speckled platinum infused Cerakote,” and “slide cut” talk at the gun counter and on Instagram than you will “I put new sights on my self defense handgun” talk.

But, alas – we did manage to find some interesting new products on the show floor that fall into this obscure category. Despite all of the above, upgrading the sights on your defensive handgun is often one of the most practical and affordable ways to make it better and more useful.

Below are the top three most interesting new (new to us, at least) pistol sight upgrades we found on the SHOT Show 18 show floor, and an honorable mention that will help you with the others.   Continue reading

Brownells Makes History, Launches Retro Rifles Line

Models include four 5.56mm and two .308/7.62 variants

It’s been 79 years in the making and last week at SHOT Show, Brownells joined the ranks of America’s gun manufacturers. Given the company’s long history of serving the firearms community with firearms, parts, and accessories, it only makes sense the company’s first firearms are legitimately old school – retro AR-15 rifles that will appeal to those interested in historically accurate recreations of early models of America’s Rifle.

Brownells newly-created Retro Rifles line features four 5.56mm variants and two .308/7.62 variants.  The 5.56mm models feature the correct styling for rifles issued to GIs in the 1960s. The .308/7.62 models reflect the lightweight styling of Eugene Stoner’s original AR-10 design.

Several models are available and shipping now. The BRN-16A1 is a close copy of the iconic M16A1 first fielded in 1960s. The matte gray anodized receivers mimic the originals and the rifle features black furniture with period-correct contours with a full fence M16A1 profile lower receiver and a 20” 5.56 lightweight chrome-lined barrel with 1-12″ twist that terminates in a M16A1 Flash hider. The upper features an M16A1 bolt carrier group with phosphate finish and chrome lining and a standard charging handle. The 16A1 ships with a 20-round aluminum magazine, all for a $1300 MSRP.   Continue reading

Mandatory Gun Locks – Coming Soon To A State Near You?

GunLockFirearms safety is every gun owner’s job – from knowing the four rules of gun safety to enacting the Own It/Respect It/Secure It mantra of NSSF’s Project Childsafe. With many states eyeing legislation (no fewer than 15 states have proposed legislation in the past year and another dozen or so with it already on the books) to mimic California’s state gun lock law, a number of manufacturers are offering solutions intended to prevent unauthorized access to firearms. We had a chance to visit with a few of them at SHOT Show 2018.

Traditional Firearm Security

Before we get into the new stuff, let’s cover the way we have been locking up firearms for ages. There are, obviously, the traditional safes (or, more likely, residential security containers), locking cabinets, and handgun lockboxes that prevent access to anyone without a key, combination, or approved biometric ID such as a fingerprint.  While these options are often large and allow storage of multiple weapons, they can be pricey (although a few states subsidize the purchase of a gun safe with tax credits) and it can take extra time to reach and retrieve a weapon in the event of an emergency.   Continue reading

Franklin Armory’s Reformation – Brilliant End-Run or Spotlight on NFA Absurdity

GunLink-SHOT18_001Franklin Armory mystified the shooting community in the days leading up to SHOT Show 2018. Right around two weeks ahead of the show, the company – most well known for their binary triggers – issued a press release with photos of a weapon that, for all intents and purposes, appeared to be an NFA-regulated short barreled rifle (SBR).  However, Franklin claimed that the item shown was not a rifle (so, not an SBR) nor were they playing sneaky semantics games with a shotgun (and, thus, not an SBS).  Readers were left scratching their heads and trying to figure out how it might fit into the generic “firearm” category that might escape the purview of NFA regulations

Rumors swept the internet, along with speculation on how Franklin Armory had achieved this feat, if they had achieved it at all – many thought that the company was just trolling to generate buzz and that the new firearm, dubbed the Reformation, was just their 11.5″ SBR and that the entire campaign was a hoax.  Everyone loves a good puzzle, and the only clues in the initial release were that the Reformation sported an 11.5″ barrel, a Magpul SL stock (not a brace), that it used patented “NRS” technology, and that it required no NFA tax stamp.

Guesses at how this was done included things like the stock being pinned to make it unusable as a stock (instead, being capable of functioning only as a cheek rest), having a smooth bore (no rifling, no short-barreled rifle) – with or without guesses at special ammunition like a rifled shotgun slug, firing only on release (to skirt the definition of one round per trigger pull), and other theories.

This is not the first time that the designers at Franklin Armory were able to dance around BATFE definitions of certain classes of firearms (see the XO-26, which sports a short barrel, pistol brace, and VFG, yet is not an AOW). The company played the Reformation release close to their vest, letting the shooting community continue to guess right up through their SHOT Show announcement.   Continue reading

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